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Sana Tamzini

sana-tamzini"I love you more than you can imagine. But I have to go. Time will pass and I will return."
Jalila Hafsia, Cendre à l'aube, 1975 [1]

Having studied in Paris and Montreal, Sana Tamzini returned to Tunisia in 2003 determined to be involved in the cultural landscape of her home country. Her phenomenal energy and devotion as a cultural manager, facilitator, teacher, and curator are well known. Her artistic practice is viscerally interlinked with her militancy and active engagement in the Tunisian art world. Discreet, poetic and ephemeral in nature, her works primarily involve light installations, photography, video and performance with a profound socio-political grounding. She is devoted to working with spaces in situ, spotlighting their specificities following attentive research into the place and its past and present inhabitants or users. Tamzini's interests lie in geography, history, architecture, heritage in the widest sense of term and popular traditions.

Born in Kairouan which is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, she has studied troglodyte habitat in particular and is invested in recording and transmitting any traditional custom or skill which is on the verge of extinction. Thus, she regularly pays homage to disappearing agricultural knowledge and craftsmanship in various projects. In 2013, she created an installation and a performance relating to the gathering of Esparto grass - a fibre used to make doormats and baskets - in the village of Takrouna; and in Chénini, she worked with Ammek Ali Sanoun, the last stone breaker in the area, to create a projection and performance in a grotto titled Khadem ala ijebel ib kadouma (Tackling the Mountain with a Pickax) after a Tunisian proverb. [1].....READ MORE
By Caroline Hancock |  April 2014
www.universes-in-universe.org

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